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Medical leadership in transformation: new ideas and practices at a crossroads in social sciences
  1. Wouter Keijser1,2,
  2. Graeme Martin3
  1. 1Faculty of Behavioral, Management and Social Sciences (BMS) Change Management and Organizational Behaviour (CMOB), Universiteit Twente, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  2. 2DIRMI Institution Foundation, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  3. 3School of Business, University of Dundee, Dundee, Dundee, UK
  1. Correspondence to Wouter Keijser, Faculty of Behavioral, Management and Social Sciences (BMS) Change Management and Organizational Behaviour (CMOB), Universiteit Twente, Utrecht 7522 NB, The Netherlands; wouter{at}keijser.com

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Medical leadership in transformation: new ideas and practices at a crossroads in social sciences

This BMJ Leader special section comprises four distinct contributions presented during a healthcare division panel symposium that took place at the Annual Conference of the Academy of Management, Chicago, 2018. During this event, an international group of practitioners and scholars representing various academic and field expertise, discussed the practice of, and research into, doctors’ changing professional identities and how these have shaped the emerging phenomenon of medical leadership.

Healthcare systems worldwide are faced with challenges arising from increasing demands and resource constraints, technological innovations, widespread access to medical knowledge and growing tensions created by multiple institutional logics (or broader belief systems) that are reshaping actors’ cognitions and actions. One result is a shift towards more fluid interprofessional boundaries within the healthcare workforce and towards greater equality or ‘mutuality’ in power relations between professionals and patients/consumers.1 ,2 A second is a professional identity problem concerning the contested meaning of medical professionalism in these times of transformation.3

In the last decade or so, there has been a ‘turn’ to medical leadership. Much of the current literature on this topic has seen the turn as an essential element in the re-professionalisation of doctors,4 ,5 whereby medical …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @WouterKeijser

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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