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10 minutes with Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard
  1. Cian Wade
  1. Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Cian Wade, Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, London, UK; cian.wade{at}aomrc.org.uk

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Biography

Dr Cian Wade, National Medical Director’s Clinical Fellow

Clinical Fellow at the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and NHS England/NHS Improvement

Cian is a junior doctor working as a National Medical Director’s Clinical Fellow. The scheme is organised by the Faculty of Medical Leadership & Management. He is hosted by both the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and NHS England/NHS Improvement’s National Patient Safety Team. Prior to this, he recently completed his Academic Foundation Programme in the Oxford Deanery, having graduated from the University of Oxford medical school in 2018. Cian is using his fellowship year to explore the leadership capabilities required in order to deliver meaningful improvements in complex healthcare systems. He feels particularly privileged to be working so closely alongside prominent medical leaders in such an extraordinarily challenging year for our healthcare systems.

Interview and write-up by Dr Cian Wade, National Medical Director’s Clinical Fellow

What are the key leadership messages you want to get out to the BMJ Leader readership?

I very much see leadership as a journey, not a destination. There will be numerous opportunities along the road to both develop and express different leadership qualities. As you progress, it is important that you continually reflect on what your intrinsic leadership strengths are, and which ones you may need to work on slightly more. I’ve personally found that leadership journeys are often shaped more by serendipity than extensive planning. It’s therefore important to be comfortable with embracing opportunities as they arise and then learning from the different challenges that they pose. Maintaining a clinical practice alongside your leadership roles can also be a challenge. There are the different workloads that need juggling, the added time pressures, and the need to constantly check that you’re viewing your leadership and clinical problems through the correct lenses for the situation. However, I personally find them both hugely complementary. Clinical work keeps you grounded as to …

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Footnotes

  • Author note Date of interview: 25th November 2020

  • Contributors CW conducted the interview with HS-L. CW wrote the article. HSL approved the article.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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